More Than a Hashtag #PhilandoCastile

Unfortunately, Facebook has already pulled the live video of Philando Castile’s murder. While many people are still raw and emotional over the death of Alton Sterling, we now have to process the death of Philando Castile. Our men are more than hashtags. They were men with families. Both MURDERED in front of their children by people who have pledged to protect us.

I pray that all people will unite together like they did for Harambe. I cannot understand how a gorilla receives more love than a person. Although Alton and Philando were treated no better than a wild animal, let us remember them as fine Black men taken from their communities. Stolen from their families. Their full potential never realized.

Let us never become complacent. Let this never become the norm. Each day, fight for your community so that we will live in a nation where hashtags like #AltonSterling, #PhilandoCastile, and #BlackLivesMatter are no longer necessary.

Read the article for more information at CBS Minnesota.

Independence Day

Today is the great day known as Independence Day. Many are celebrating with their family and friends. They may be having a cookout in their backyard, enjoying a local parade, going to the shore, or enjoying a local concert. This great day of celebrating will end with a grandiose display of fireworks set to a mix of contemporary music and patriotic tunes that make us proud to be an American. We sit back, smile, and reflect. Wow…it’s so great that we are independent and free. Whoa hold up…

I’m not sure about you, but I don’t think that all of us are so independent and free. Many people are still fighting for equality. We are still fighting to live in a nation where privilege is not limited to only white, cis men. We are fighting for equal sentencing where someone’s daddy is not worried that he won’t have steak for six months. We are fighting to have less regulation over women. Why do guns get a better deal than my body? We are fighting against police brutality—Michael Brown, Rekia Boyd, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Tanisha Anderson, Freddie Gray, Mya Hall, Jonathan Sanders, and Sandra Bland should never be forgotten. We are fighting to keep families together instead of building walls and deporting anyone with melanin. How do you plan to make America great again? Do you plan on pushing everyone out based on the one drop rule?

As we continue in this year, let’s continue our fight for equality for all. Fight hate and discrimination with your words and actions. And as always…march to the beat of your drum. 

The Thugs of North Beach Avenue #ChangeTheNarrative

“The truth can never be known. It can only be told in a story.”—Alex Haley, Roots

Earlier today, I saw this video of the beach brawl that occurred at North Avenue Beach in Chicago during Memorial Weekend. For the first time in media reporting, I was not surprised by what I saw. There was no mention of these hoodlums being called thugs. That’s what they are. The police did not arrest any of these gangbangers for this uprising. That’s what it was. These delinquents left the place a mess with trash littered all over the place like it was a riot. Yet, the media just said that these lovely ‘beachgoers” were only involved in a brawl or melee.

It’s time to change the narrative. If we are supposed to be all-inclusive and say that #AllLivesMatter, then we need to be all-inclusive in our offensive reporting. Let’s discuss how these thugs had a terroristic uprising. Isn’t that what you said my people did in Ferguson and Baltimore? We were protesting the unlawful death of two young Black men. What were these thugs protesting at North Avenue Beach? Too much sunshine…not enough beer? Talk about privilege.

Why aren’t we talking about their families? It’s obvious that roughnecks like the people in this video must come from broken homes. I know that people from good homes just don’t act like this. Their mothers must be drunks, hos, and prostitutes. They have to have at least five or six kids. Let’s not even start on their fathers. You know their fathers were in and out of their lives, and they were either in jail or slinging drugs on the corner. You know how those white men are (wink wink). They are all the same. Convicts and brutes. I can’t wait to hear about their criminal records. Only people from broken homes act like this.

I am no longer waiting on mainstream media to change the narrative. Our truth will only be known when we tell our own stories. Let’s continue to tell our truth, our way, without the offensive descriptions. In the meantime, let’s rewrite their stories by using the offensive language that they naturally use on us. So the next time they decide to burn a city during a pumpkin smashing or flip cars after a football game, repost the uprising with your narrative. #ChangeTheNarrative

Police Brutality of Tacoma Teen

Can somebody please explain to me why this girl was tasered and beaten? I don’t see where it escalated to that point, and he could have taken her down without incident. This is beyond ridiculous! The police officer should be suspended immediately and fired after a quick investigation. ‪#‎SayHerName ‬‪#‎SaveOurGirls‬ ‪#‎BlackLivesMatter‬

Twitter’s Technical Foul

I’m a little confused by this one. I can’t understand why this image was considered sensitive media on Twitter. Of all the vile amount of crap that is not filtered on Twitter, I had to approve this loving image between parent and child.

Many minorities have started their own media outlets to support their visions, share their views, and portray the positive images that were lacking in mainstream media. For example, I created this blog after prompting from several individuals to provide another outlet for people who shared viewpoints and interests similar to mine. While we have progressed in mainstream media, we know that we still have a long way to go. We had national examples such as #OscarsSoWhite and Melissa Harris-Perry’s departure from MSNBC earlier this year.

Yet, we also know that there are smaller examples that we can see on a daily basis, and we all work together to combat the negative stereotypes. Throughout my timeline, my friends and I share positive images of our communities. Black men with their children. Latinas progressing through corporate America or breaking glass ceilings by founding their own businesses. Native American youth soaring high through their scholastic achievements.

We know about ALL of the positive aspects within our communities, such as the genuine love between mother and child. So I cannot understand why I had to approve this beautiful image that was attached to BonBon Break’s tweet.  The post was not labeled sensitive, the blog was not labeled sensitive, and I’m led to believe that hashtags (#race and #blacklivesmatter) are not labeled sensitive either. Just the image. I cannot understand why. I’m hoping Twitter will respond to my query, but  who knows…Until then, I will just say that Twitter made a technical foul.